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NDS – DPG batch encoder

BatchDPG is a program I’ve been working on, because I was irritated with dpgenc for a number of reasons. However, as I simply do not know how to create a DPG header, it still uses dpgenc. So why did I create this program? Well, there are a number of reasons;
– Support for pretty much any file you can play in DirectShow based media players such as Windows Media Player and Media Player Classic. This means you’re not limited to AVI, WMV and MPG anymore.
– It’s very easy to add subtitles. Currently only SRT, SSA and ASS can be selected, but it’s very simple for me to change the code so it supports others. Anything VSFilter (the best subtitle renderer around) can handle is therefore possible to add.
– Better quality, both video and audio wise. Audio because a better resampler is used, and video because a better resizer is used and extra options are added to the mencoder commandline (mencoder is the program dpgenc uses for the video conversion to MPEG-1). In fact, you can choose different video quality settings according to your demands. The High settings is quite slow, so Medium is recommended, while Low should offer quality equivalent to the dpgenc default settings.
– Set any bitrate you want. This means you can go above the normal limit of 256 too. Note that this is just a target bitrate. It will probably use less if you set it very high.
– Max video bitrate option. This helps prevent those skips which sometimes occur. I havn’t done any serious testing, but MoonShell seems to be able to handle a total bitrate of 512 kbps (video+audio) perfectly.
– Automatic framerate calculation. This assumes Height * Width * FPS = 737280. So with a 256×192 (Fullscreen) video, this would result in the framerate being 15. A 256×144 (Widescreen) video would have a bitrate of 20.
– Batch encoding! You can safely leave a number of files in the queue and it will automatically convert one after the other.

So how does it do all these things? Well, the first thing it does is create an Avisynth AVS file. Avisynth is a great videoediting system, but unfortunately dpgenc can’t directly open AVS files. To circumvent that, VFAPIConv is used to create a dummy AVI file, which dpgenc can read. BatchDPG then creates a dpgenc.ini with necessary instructions, after which it will start dpgenc itself and do the actual video and audio encoding.

The installation instructions are as followed:
– Install Avisynth from download. Make sure to get the 2.5 version, not the 2.0.
– Install this file to any place you like: download / download.

BatchDPG is a program that solves some of the inconviniences of the original DPG-encoder.

– Support for pretty much any file you can play in DirectShow based media players such as Windows Media Player and Media Player Classic. This means you’re not limited to AVI, WMV and MPG anymore.

– It’s very easy to add subtitles. Currently only SRT, SSA and ASS can be selected, but it’s very simple for me to change the code so it supports others. Anything VSFilter (the best subtitle renderer around) can handle is therefore possible to add.

– Better quality, both video and audio wise. Audio because a better resampler is used, and video because a better resizer is used and extra options are added to the mencoder commandline (mencoder is the program dpgenc uses for the video conversion to MPEG-1). In fact, you can choose different video quality settings according to your demands. The High settings is quite slow, so Medium is recommended, while Low should offer quality equivalent to the dpgenc default settings.

– Set any bitrate you want. This means you can go above the normal limit of 256 too. Note that this is just a target bitrate. It will probably use less if you set it very high.

– Max video bitrate option. This helps prevent those skips which sometimes occur. I havn’t done any serious testing, but MoonShell seems to be able to handle a total bitrate of 512 kbps (video+audio) perfectly.

– Automatic framerate calculation. This assumes Height * Width * FPS = 737280. So with a 256×192 (Fullscreen) video, this would result in the framerate being 15. A 256×144 (Widescreen) video would have a bitrate of 20.

– Batch encoding! You can safely leave a number of files in the queue and it will automatically convert one after the other.

So how does it do all these things? Well, the first thing it does is create an Avisynth AVS file. Avisynth is a great video editing system, but unfortunately dpgenc can’t directly open AVS files. To circumvent that, VFAPIConv is used to create a dummy AVI file, which dpgenc can read. BatchDPG then creates a dpgenc.ini with necessary instructions, after which it will start dpgenc itself and do the actual video and audio encoding.

The current version is 0.5

Known issue that will be fixed in the next release (coming soon):

When the BatchDPG window is not active at the end of coding a file, the next file of the batch will not load.

Home of the program :

dowload

The installation instructions are as followed:

– Install Avisynth from download.
Make sure to get the 2.5 version, not the 2.0.

– Install this file to any place you like: download

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About Kemo

I am just an ordinary person in the garden.

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